22 Best-Paying Jobs in Oil and Gas Transmission

Through the course of its history, the oil and gas industry has consistently delivered one-of-a-kind employment opportunities all over the world. Although some of these vocations may have their share of highs and lows, because business has expanded with the help of new technologies, it is now much simpler for people to discover employment that pays the best salaries in the oil and gas transmission industry. One of the sub-sectors that fall under the umbrella of the oil and gas industry is the transmission of oil and gas. This subsector has one of the highest-paying jobs in the oil and gas transmission industry and gives its workers access to several benefits that aren’t available anywhere else. 

 According to the data provided by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, most oil and gas transmission companies in the sector use transmission pipes to transport natural crude oil and gas. This article will give insight into the best-paying jobs in the oil and gas transmission industry. 

1. Drilling Engineer

You could work on land or offshore platforms as a drilling engineer. A drilling engineer must oversee and manage the drilling of oil and gas wells. In addition, they supervise the drilling of new wells and the upkeep of existing ones.

Salary: The average annual salary for a drilling engineer s $123,800

Education and Experience:

A bachelor’s degree in engineering, geology, or a related discipline is often required for drilling engineers. No prior experience is needed, but it will help if you have worked on rigs or in an onshore yard. 

2. Sub-Sea Engineer

The design and installation of machinery for use below the water’s surface is the responsibility of subsea engineers. These equipment include but are not limited to pipelines, cables, and other apparatus utilized to transport oil, gas, water, or any other resource below the ocean floor. As a subsea engineer, one of your jobs is to help both offshore and onshore teams with technical and engineering work.

Salary: The average annual salary for a subsea engineer is $106,090

Education and Experience:

To be eligible for employment as a subsea engineer, you need to have a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering, petroleum engineering, mechanical engineering, or another field closely linked to engineering. Employers typically prefer candidates with a master’s degree in subsea engineering or an area closely related to it. On-the-job training is the primary means by which experience in subsea engineering is obtained.

3. Petroleum Engineering

A petroleum engineer’s job is to find new oil and gas resources, develop new ways to make oil and gas, and design the equipment used to get the oil and gas.

Salary: The average annual salary for a petroleum engineer is $100,890

Education and Experience:

The first thing to do after graduating from high school is to earn a bachelor’s degree in engineering, preferably in a field related to engineering, such as petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, or another relevant engineering subject. In addition, it is beneficial to have a master’s degree in petroleum engineering or a discipline comparable to it if you are seeking a managerial position. To get started, you need to have worked in a petroleum engineering field entry-level job before.

4. Geophysicists

Geophysicists are experts who study the structure of the earth. They are aware of the processes that can result in seismic waves, such as earthquakes and explosions, and the effects those processes can have. In addition to that, they do research to develop innovative technologies used in the oil and gas industry.

Salary: The average annual salary for a geophysicist is $90,104

Education and Experience:

A geophysicist must have a bachelor’s degree in either geophysics, geology, or an academically equivalent field. However, certain businesses prefer candidates with a master’s degree in geophysics. In addition, to practice in that region, they must get a professional license. Geophysicists acquire the vast bulk of their knowledge through the completion of formal education, but in addition, they gain experience through internships.

5. Senior Landman

The senior landman is in charge of securing drilling agreements with landowners. The first thing they do is determine the land’s owner and then check to see if it is available for purchase. As a senior landman, it is your responsibility to guarantee that all land transactions are carried out in compliance with the regulations set forth by the government.

Salary: The average annual salary for a senior landman is $98,600

Education and Experience:

To get to the position of a senior landman, you will need a bachelor’s degree in land and resource management, political science, or another field with comparable coursework. The minimum experience required to be a senior landman is two years.

6. Drilling Supervisor

On an oil rig, the drilling supervisor’s responsibility is to oversee all of the drilling operations. In addition, they ensure that every task is carried out safely and effectively and by the approved drilling manual, laws and regulations imposed by the government, and, lastly, the processes that the company has developed. 

Salary: The average annual salary for a drilling supervisor is $77,001

Education and Experience:

An individual must have either a high school diploma or a GED to be eligible for employment as a drilling supervisor. However, several businesses prefer candidates who have earned a bachelor’s degree in geology, petroleum engineering, or a related field of study. On-the-job training for drilling supervisors often lasts from a few weeks to a month and can last anywhere between. An already-employed drilling supervisor may be in charge of the training.

7. Pipeline Engineers

Engineers in the pipeline industry design and construct pipe networks to transport a variety of commodities, including oil and gas. They perform site assessments, design pipeline systems, build and install commercial and industrial infrastructure, and create new pipeline systems. In addition, they do maintenance and repairs on pumping systems and pipelines, as well as quality control inspections.

Salary: The average annual salary for a pipeline engineer is $85,454

Education and Experience:

Engineers who work on pipelines are expected to have a bachelor’s degree. Most pipeline engineers have degrees in engineering, most commonly in either civil, mechanical, or industrial engineering. In addition, those who wish to work on public projects as engineers must obtain a professional engineer license. The prerequisites for obtaining a PE license differ from state to state. Pipeline engineers also get more training on the job from the company they work for once they are hired.

8. Mechanical Engineer

A mechanical engineer makes the tools that other engineers use daily, such as pipes, valves, and turbines. Mechanical engineers evaluate any operational issues brought to their attention by technicians and design new or existing modified pieces of machinery. In addition to this, they guarantee that the equipment is risk-free to use.

Salary: The average annual salary for a mechanical is $78,312

Education and Experience:

Mechanical engineers are needed to have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in the field of mechanical engineering. A graduate degree, such as a Doctor of Jurisprudence, is an option that some people may decide to pursue. Professional licensing as a Professional Engineer is required for mechanical engineers in every state (PE). To become a licensed professional engineer (PE), you need to have a bachelor’s degree from a four-year college certified by ABET and job experience gained while being supervised by a PE.

9. Oil Truck Driver

Someone who possesses a license that allows them to operate a truck or other large vehicle to transport and store oil and gas is known as a truck driver. Truck drivers have several important tasks, one of which is securely transporting and storing oil and gas.

Salary: The average annual salary for an oil truck driver is $75,887

Education and Experience:

Most companies require oil truck drivers to have either a high school diploma or a general equivalency diploma (GED). A certificate from an accredited postsecondary institution or an associate’s degree in transportation or logistics may be required for certain positions. Working on public roadways necessitates possession of a valid CDL. Check your state’s regulations to see what kind of vehicle you need to drive to get your commercial driver’s license. The requirements for getting a CDL are different in each state.

10. Completion Engineer

Completion engineers are responsible for designing and supervising the first well completion. In addition, they work with the rest of the oilwell delivery team and with departments, local governments, and regulators to ensure that the oilwell delivery process will be done on time and within the budget.

Salary: The average annual salary for a completion engineer is $76,211

Education and Experience:

To qualify for a completion engineer job, you need a bachelor’s degree in petroleum engineering. On the other hand, candidates can be expected to get a master’s degree in petroleum engineering if they want to work for certain companies. Employers are also more interested in hiring people who have worked in the same or a related industry for at least five years.

11. Land Agents

Land agents facilitate the negotiation of surface rights agreements between landowners and prospective tenants. Rights-of-way must be negotiated for well sites, pipelines, electricity lines, coal mines, roads, cell towers, wind, and solar projects, road easements, and other surface uses.

Salary: The average annual salary for a land agent is $74,600

Education and Experience:

Most states require land agents to have either a high school diploma or a GED. However, some businesses may prefer job applicants with bachelor’s degrees in relevant fields, such as agriculture, real estate, or other related fields. In addition, land agents usually don’t need to have worked in the area before because their new employer will usually train them on the job.

12. Energy Engineer

A person who specializes in extracting energy from its natural sources is known as an energy engineer. An energy engineer is also in charge of choosing and making hardware and software related to energy.

Salary: The average annual salary for an energy engineer is $72,112

Education and Experience:

 Most energy engineers earn a bachelor’s degree in engineering to begin their careers. However, before applying for a position as a full-time energy engineer, it could be advantageous to first work for a few years as an entry-level engineer after graduation to obtain some professional experience. In several states, getting an engineering license is necessary to work in a technical position of a higher degree. However, even if a candidate has a license in engineering, they may need to be a better fit for a job at a particular company.

13. Land Acquisition Analyst

Before a company commits to buying a piece of real estate, it will hire a land acquisition analyst to do market research and compile a report detailing its findings. They look for people interested in purchasing land; review market activity and financial trends; and assess, appraise and investigate the costs and benefits of buying property. Other responsibilities include checking the property’s title, ensuring the seller’s claims are true and gathering documents and information to help the company buy the property.

Salary: The average annual salary for a land acquisition analyst is $68,904

Education and Experience:

Experts in land acquisition must have at least a bachelor’s degree in a discipline such as business, real estate, law, engineering, or another relevant field. Preferred qualifications include prior experience, expertise with the permitting process, and an understanding of applicable real estate, tax, and accounting regulations.

14. Landman

Negotiating land ownership, leases, and mineral rights with landowners is a landman’s primary responsibility, typically employed by companies in the mineral, oil, and gas industries. Before beginning negotiations, the landman investigated his rights, interests, and land ownership. A landman is responsible for the creation of contracts, the verification of title papers, the acquisition of leases, the inspection of the land, and the assurance that it complies with government regulations and industry standards.

Salary: The average annual salary for a landman is $65,730

Education and Experience:

To work as a landman, you need a bachelor’s degree in a relevant field, such as land and resource management, political science, or another related field. In addition, you must have previous experience in the oil and gas industry to work as a land worker in that area.

15. Production Engineer

 The production engineer is the person who is responsible for evaluating the efficiency of the inflow and outflow of fluids between the reservoir and the wellbore. The design of the complete system comprises the selection of tubes, perforating, and management of sand, as well as matrix stimulation and hydraulic fracturing.

Salary: The average annual salary for a production engineer is $64,007

Education and Experience:

To work as a production engineer, you must have a bachelor’s degree in petroleum engineering. A graduate degree is not necessarily required, but many companies prefer to hire candidates who have one, and having one can increase your earning potential. To get a license to practice engineering, you need at least four years of experience working in the field while being supervised by a licensed engineer.

16. Oil Field Operator

An oil field operator is responsible for installing and operating heavy machinery on an oil rig. This machinery may include pressure control devices or safety systems designed to handle individual wells. You might also have to make minor repairs, switch between rigs when needed, keep an eye on gauges and valves, and help stop spills caused by broken equipment, but this will depend on what your boss wants from you.

Salary: The average annual salary for an oil field operator is $55,129

Education and Experience:

There is typically a need for oil field operators to possess either a high school diploma or a GED certificate. However, some employers will prioritize job applicants with an associate’s degree program in petroleum engineering or a subject with comparable coursework. In addition, apprenticeship programs teach oil field operators on the job, so they don’t need any experience before starting.

17. Mud Logger

 The task of determining the makeup of subterranean formations falls to a professional known as a mud logger. They use sophisticated technology to bore holes into the ground to retrieve mud, rock, oil, and other minerals samples. They also look at the results of tests done on oil and gas wells. These tests may include gamma-ray scans, x-ray scans, or acoustic scans.

Salary: The average annual salary for a mud logger is $53,111

Education and Experiment:

It is typical for employers to require mud loggers to have a high school diploma or an equivalent. Some companies prefer applicants with bachelor’s degrees in geophysics or a very closely related field. Mud loggers must have at least four years of experience working in the field. 

18. Hydrographic Surveyor

Hydrographic surveyors are vital to the oil and gas business. A hydrographic surveyor uses specialized equipment to generate comprehensive drawings of ports, seabeds, and other buildings for several purposes. This task is performed by oil rigs and survey vessels, the latter of which are equipped with hydrography-specific instrumentation.

Salary: The average annual salary for a hydrographic surveyor is $53,222

Education and Experience:

Although candidates with a bachelor’s degree can apply for the role of hydrographic surveyor, many higher-level positions require a master’s degree. Employers place a premium on maritime, surveying, and computer skills.

19. Rig Welders

Rig welders join metal plates and other materials to provide structural support for drilling rigs, oil platforms, and other massive industrial machinery. Rig welders must also analyze blueprints and designs to determine the optimal welding operation.

Salary: The average annual salary for a rig welder is $52,111

Education and Experience:

Typically, a high school diploma or GED is required of rig welders. Some employers may require you to obtain a postsecondary certificate or associate’s degree in welding or a related field. Most places that hire welders will train them on the job, so having experience is unnecessary. 

20. Rig Operators

Drilling rig operators, wellhead operators, and other operators of extraction equipment for minerals, natural gas, and oil are collectively referred to as rig operators. In the oilfield, they keep an eye on the levels of drilling fluid, the mud weight, and the fluid rates.

Salary: The average annual salary for a rig operator is $50,982

Education and Experience:

Most oilfield operators only need a high school diploma or a General Equivalency Diploma (GED). Operators of drilling rigs can earn a range of certifications that attest to their proficiency in various subfields of drilling operations. Since rig operators are trained on the job, they don’t need prior experience before being hired.

21. Petroleum Inspectors

Petroleum inspectors ensure that the crude oil and natural gas extracted from the ground are fit for human consumption. They check drilling sites, storage tanks, and equipment to ensure safety rules are being followed.

Salary: The average annual salary for a petroleum inspector is $50,203

Education and Experience:

It is common practice for employers of petroleum inspectors to require either a high school certificate or a General Equivalency Diploma (GED). In addition, inspectors in the petroleum industry are expected to have worked in the field for at least two years.

22. Pipeline Inspectors

Pipeline inspectors are accountable for ensuring that our nation’s pipelines are safe. They conduct routine inspections of these pipelines to look for any symptoms of deterioration or corrosion that could lead to a leak or a rupture. They are supposed to tell their supervisor about any problems they find so that repairs are done as quickly as possible.

Salary: The average annual salary for a pipeline inspector is $50,299

Education and Experience:

Entry-level pipeline inspectors must have either a high school diploma or a GED. Some companies provide hiring preference to candidates who have earned a bachelor’s degree or an associate’s degree in engineering, construction, or a field that is otherwise comparable. Pipeline inspectors must have at least five years of experience in the field.